Search Results for: clerk cum deo results in 19 january 2014

Role of SEO in Increasing The Website Potential

This is a Guest Post by an Anonymous writer.

website ideas

Are you wondering why your well-designed website is not showing up among the top results in the Google searches while other sites that are far inferior to yours are getting better rankings? You may be lacking a good SEO strategy. Search Engine Optimization plays a major role in bringing more number of visitors to your website. Out of which some become potential customers.  Here’s why you need different SEO tools and techniques to run a successful online business.

Improving brand credibility

People believe that brands showing up at the top of Google search results are the best ones. No matter how good your products are, to make your business more credible it is necessary for your website to have a good Page Rank.

Advertising

SEO advertises your business more efficiently than conventional online advertising strategies like affiliate marketing (in fact, SEO is now considered as an advertising method). The top result in Google search is more likely to get 60% more visitors than the other search results..

Finding your audience

Use SEO tools like Google Webmaster, to help you figure out which part of your website is drawing more attention. This will help you optimise your webpage according to the needs of your target audience..

Content

Even if your website is exactly what your customer needs, the chances of it having a high page rank in the first few weeks of its launch, are unlikely. You could SEO techniques like inserting popularly searched keywords in your websites content to make it more search engine friendly.  For example, if your website is about helping people who lost money through mis-sold PPI, you have to insert frequently searched keywords like PPI Claims or PPI Claim back .These keywords can also be used in image tags and page titles for better ranks.

Link building benefits

Link building is one of the most prominent SEO techniques. Search engines rate your website based on the number of backlinks from reputed sites on the internet that point to it. Also, exchanging links with your counterpart websites will help you in maintaining healthy relations with them.

Social Media

Apart from good search engine rankings, another way of improving your brand value is increasing your site’s popularity among several online social networks. This not only helps you in gaining new business opportunities, but also helps you stay in touch with your existing customers.

Competitors

SEO tools let you know why your competitors are doing better than you. You can work your way around effective strategies by analysing your competitors’ websites and implementing new ideas for your own site.

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Top 5 Budgeting Apps for iPhone

This is a Guest Post written by Elvin, a tech writer who is into Finance and Marketing. Catch her @financeport. Payday loans are instant loans which are helpful when you run short of funds.

iPhone © by Yutaka Tsutano

In this high-tech generation most of the people are concerned about their lifestyles. People are making every possible way to save money. The technology is making some fabulous innovations which can track your expenses and make you think beyond your expenses.

In the market there is lots of boom with the launch of Smartphones like Samsung S3 and the iPhone which has amazing apps which are helpful to you in your daily by many ways. These apps belong to different categories like business, finance, entertainment, gaming, sports and many more. Business, finance and gaming are most downloaded categories as these help in your work and leisure time. There are lots of finance and budgeting applications which are helpful to track your expenses and finance matters. Some of them are;

Expenditure:

Expenditure: A very nice expense tracker

This is the amazing application which tracks both finance and budget. It has superb features to make your work efficient and display the accurate results by making the transactions. This app comes with all types of the budgeting process with different categories like household budget, electronics, food and many more. When you do any transaction it will give you the accurate report. It also has the inbuilt currency converter to make your transactions go easy.

Visit iTunes App Store for Expenditure

Smart Budget:

Smart Budget : With smart interface

This application lets you to control your expense in a smart way. It gives you the details of each and every penny spends. It shows you the details in different categories. It calculates your income, salary, incentives and the expenditures like food, clothing, accommodation, travel, hotel etc… This app keeps the track of things how much they are used and things which are never used. It shows you the results in daily, weekly or on a monthly basis. It produces the report in the form of sheets and graphs. It is a simple budgeting to use.

Visit iTunes App Store for Smart Budget

Spendings:

Spendings: A lightweight app

This is also the amazing application which shows you the report on a weekly budget. It is as simple as opening an account and maintaining it. It tracks all the money you got and the money you spend. It provides you the detailed information about the Spendings on the purchased items. It also has the option of currency converter from dollars to pounds which makes you easy to understand and handle the budget. You can set and manage 10 various budgets at one time.

Visit iTunes App Store for Spendings

Payday Loan Calculator:

Payday Loan Calculator: Instant Cash

This is a free application for the iPhone as well as Android users. This Payday loan calculator instantly calculates all your loan premiums. All you need to do is to enter the amount and the term of the deposit with the interest fee of payday loans then this calculator will evaluate your amount display you the accurate results. It will calculate your total amounts and can also track your loan premiums which you have to pay. Calculate repayment instantly. Apply for a payday loan anywhere in the UK.

Visit iTunes App Store for Payday Loan Calculator

Pageonce:

Pageonce: Money & Bills

This is also the superb application which not tracks your budget but also tracks your bills. You can also pay your bills and loans with the help of Pageonce. You will get the detailed report of what has been paid and what is due. For this you can also set reminders. This app is smarter than the other finance apps as it is simple and can be understandable. It also tracks your daily, weekly and monthly expenses and send you the reports with details of expenses.

Visit iTunes App Store for Pageonce
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MBAs are Overpaid Clerks

A clerk is a person employed in an office or bank to keep records or accounts and to undertake other routine administrative duties, as said by Concise Oxford English Dictionary. In the present time, the most popular degree is MBA. A large number of MBA graduates are coming in the working arena every year. The job an MBA graduate should ideally do is to monitor the things in an organised way, such that the revenue generation for the organisation is highest.

Till 50s or 60s, it was hard to find a well-trained person for a job with the specific technical skill. Many people being employed first learn how to do a particular work. But, in the present time, it has become very easy to get a well-trained person. So, the productivity of the organisations has increased a lot. At every level managerial post are being filled with people having MBA degrees. The jobs done by them are not directly of the same nature as of any clerk’s. Clerks used to maintain records or accounts. But, if we see the nature of many professionals with an MBA degree is to maintain records or accounts. Like for account section we have persons with MBA in finance. For employees records we have MBAs in HR. Even in the banking sectors, the typical works which used to be done by clerks are now handled by MBA persons. Of course, we don’t call them clerks. They are referred with the names of Executives.

Therefore, if one may see in this more organized world, clerks are being replaced by MBA professionals. But, they are not overpaid. They are getting the exact amount of money that they are worth. The quality of work has improved, so has the salary. Hence, MBAs are not overpaid clerks.

Share Market Terminology: Part 2

<<<< Share Market Terminology: Part 1

1.     NASDAQ

The NASDAQ Stock Market, also known as the NASDAQ, is an American stock exchange located in New York City. “NASDAQ” originally stood for “National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations Systems,” but the exchange’s official stance is that the acronym is obsolete. It is the largest electronic screen-based equity securities trading market in the United States and fourth largest by market capitalization in the world. As of January 13, 2011, there are 2,872 listings. The NASDAQ has more trading volume than any other electronic stock exchange in the world.

NASDAQ has three indices; NASDAQ Composite, NASDAQ-100 and NASDAQ Biotechnology Index. Its market capitalization is US$3.08 trillion (Aug 2010).

2.     Blue Chip

A blue-chip stock is stock in a company with a national reputation for quality, reliability and the ability to operate profitably in good times and bad. The most popular index which follows blue chips is the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted average of 30 blue-chip stocks that are generally the leaders in their industry.

3.     Book Value

In accounting, book value or carrying value is the value of an asset according to its balance sheet account balance. For assets, the value is based on the original cost of the asset less any depreciation, amortization or impairment costs made against the asset. Traditionally, a company’s book value is its total assets minus intangible assets and liabilities. However, in practice, depending on the source of the calculation, book value may variably include goodwill, intangible assets, or both.

4.     Market Capitalization

Market capitalization (often market cap) is a measurement of size of a business enterprise (corporation) equal to the share price times the number of shares outstanding (shares that have been authorized, issued, and purchased by investors) of a publicly traded company. As owning stock represents ownership of the company, including all its equity, capitalization could represent the public opinion of a company’s net worth and is a determining factor in stock valuation. Likewise, the capitalization of stock markets or economic regions may be compared to other economic indicators. The total market capitalization of all publicly traded companies in the world was US$51.2 trillion in January 2007 and rose as high as US$57.5 trillion in May 2008 before dropping below US$50 trillion in August 2008 and slightly above US$40 trillion in September 2008.

5.     P/E Ratio

The P/E ratio (price-to-earnings ratio) of a stock (also called its “P/E”, or simply “multiple”) is a measure of the price paid for a share relative to the annual net income or profit earned by the firm per share. P/E reflects the capital structure of the company in question. P/E is a financial ratio used for valuation: a higher P/E ratio means that investors are paying more for each unit of net income, so the stock is more expensive compared to one with lower P/E ratio. The P/E ratio has units of years, which can be interpreted as “number of years of earnings to pay back purchase price”, ignoring the time value of money. In other words, P/E ratio shows current investor demand for a company share.

6.     Spread

The difference between the price paid for a bond (the bid) and the price at which it is offered to an investor (the offer).

7.     Preference Share

Capital stock which provides a specific dividend that is paid before any dividends are paid to common stock holders, and which takes precedence over common stock in the event of liquidation. Like common stock, preference shares represent partial ownership in a company, although preferred stock shareholders do not enjoy any of the voting rights of common stockholders. Also unlike common stock, preference shares pay a fixed dividend that does not fluctuate, although the company does not have to pay this dividend if it lacks the financial ability to do so. The main benefit to owning preference shares are that the investor has a greater claim on the company’s assets than common stockholders. Preferred shareholders always receive their dividends first and, in the event the company goes bankrupt, preferred shareholders are paid off before common stockholders.

8.     Equity share

Equity shares are those shares which are ordinary in the course of company’s business. They are also called as ordinary shares. These shareholders do not enjoy preference regarding payment of dividend and repayment of capital. Equity shareholders are paid dividend out of the profits made by a company. Higher the profits, higher will be the dividend and lower the profits, lower will be the dividend.

9.     Convertible Preference Share

These are preferred issues that the holders can exchange for a predetermined number of the company’s common stock. This exchange can occur at any time the investor chooses regardless of the current market price of the common stock. It is a one way deal so one cannot convert the common stock back to preferred stock.

10. Debenture

The term is used for a medium- to long-term debt instrument used by large companies to borrow money. In some countries the term is used interchangeably with bond, loan stock or note.

Debentures are generally freely transferable by the debenture holder. Debenture holders have no rights to vote in the company’s general meetings of shareholders, but they may have separate meetings or votes e.g. on changes to the rights attached to the debentures. The interest paid to them is a charge against profit in the company’s financial statements.

11. Mutual Fund

An open-ended fund operated by an investment company which raises money from shareholders and invests in a group of assets, in accordance with a stated set of objectives. mutual funds raise money by selling shares of the fund to the public, much like any other type of company can sell stock in itself to the public. Mutual funds then take the money they receive from the sale of their shares (along with any money made from previous investments) and use it to purchase various investment vehicles, such as stocks, bonds and money market instruments. In return for the money they give to the fund when purchasing shares, shareholders receive an equity position in the fund and, in effect, in each of its underlying securities. For most mutual funds, shareholders are free to sell their shares at any time, although the price of a share in a mutual fund will fluctuate daily, depending upon the performance of the securities held by the fund. Benefits of mutual funds include diversification and professional money management. Mutual funds offer choice, liquidity, and convenience, but charge fees and often require a minimum investment. A closed-end fund is often incorrectly referred to as a mutual fund, but is actually an investment trust. There are many types of mutual funds, including aggressive growth fund, asset allocation fund, balanced fund, blend fund, bond fund, capital appreciation fund, clone fund, closed fund, crossover fund, equity fund, fund of funds, global fund, growth fund, growth and income fund, hedge fund, income fund, index fund, international fund, money market fund, municipal bond fund, prime rate fund, regional fund, sector fund, specialty fund, stock fund, and tax-free bond fund.

12. Open-end Mutual Fund

A fund operated by an investment company which raises money from shareholders and invests in a group of assets, in accordance with a stated set of objectives. Open-end funds raise money by selling shares of the fund to the public, much like any other type of company which can sell stock in itself to the public. Mutual funds then take the money they receive from the sale of their shares (along with any money made from previous investments) and use it to purchase various investment vehicles, such as stocks, bonds and money market instruments. In return for the money they give to the fund when purchasing shares, shareholders receive an equity position in the fund and, in effect, in each of its underlying securities. For most open-end funds, shareholders are free to sell their shares at any time, although the price of a share in an open-end fund will fluctuate daily, depending upon the performance of the securities held by the fund. Benefits of open-end funds include diversification and professional money management. Open-end funds offer choice, liquidity, and convenience, but charge fees and often require a minimum investment.

13. Closed-end Mutual Fund

A fund with a fixed number of shares outstanding, and one which does not redeem shares the way a typical mutual fund does. Closed-end funds behave more like stock than open-end funds: closed-end funds issue a fixed number of shares to the public in an initial public offering, after which time shares in the fund are bought and sold on a stock exchange, and they are not obligated to issue new shares or redeem outstanding shares as open-end funds are. The price of a share in a closed-end fund is determined entirely by market demand, so shares can either trade below their net asset value (“at a discount”) or above it (“at a premium”).

14. Asset Management Company (AMC)

An Asset Management Company (AMC) is an investment management firm that invests the pooled funds of retail investors in securities in line with the stated investment objectives. For a fee, the investment company provides more diversification, liquidity, and professional management consulting service than is normally available to individual investors.

The diversification of portfolio is done by investing in such securities which are inversely correlated to each other. They collect money from investors by way of floating various mutual fund schemes.

15. Front End Load

A sales charge paid when an individual buys an investment, such as a mutual fund, limited partnership, annuity, or insurance policy. The load is clubbed with the first payment made by an investor, so the total initial payment is higher than the later payments. The purpose of a load is to cover administrative expenses and transaction costs and sometimes to discourage asset turnover.

16. Back End Load

A sales charge or commission paid when an individual sells an investment, such as a mutual fund or an annuity, intended to discourage withdrawals.

17. Company

A company is a form of business organization. It is a collection of individuals and physical assets with a common focus and an aim of gaining profits. This collection exists in Law and therefore a company is considered a “Legal Person”.

18. Common Seal

A common seal (sometimes referred to as the corporate seal or company seal) is an official seal used by a company. Company seals were predominantly used by companies in common law jurisdictions, although in modern times, most countries have abrogated the use of seals.

Traditionally, the seal was of some legal significance because the affixing of the seal signified that the document was the act and deed of the company, whereas when a document was merely signed by a director, then that was deemed to be an act carried out on behalf of the company by its agents, which was subject to applicable restrictions and limitations under the ordinary law of agency.

Corporate seals are generally only used for two purposes by corporations today:

Documents which need to be executed as deeds (as opposed to simple contracts), may be executed under the company’s common seal

Certain corporate documents, for example share certificates are often issued under the company seal (and some countries required that share certificates be issued under the common seal)

19. Company Secretary

A company secretary is a senior position in a private company or public organization, normally in the form of a managerial position or above. In the United States it is known as a corporate secretary.

The Company Secretary is responsible for the efficient administration of a company, particularly with regard to ensuring compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements and for ensuring that decisions of the Board of Directors are implemented.

Despite the name, the role is not a clerical or secretarial one in the usual sense. The company secretary ensures that an organization complies with relevant legislation and regulation, and keeps board members informed of their legal responsibilities. Company secretaries are the company’s named representative on legal documents, and it is their responsibility to ensure that the company and its directors operate within the law. It is also their responsibility to register and communicate with shareholders, to ensure that dividends are paid and to maintain company records, such as lists of directors and shareholders, and annual accounts.

20. Subsidiary Company

A subsidiary, in business matters, is an entity that is controlled by a separate higher entity. The controlled entity is called a company, corporation, or limited liability company; and in some cases can be a government or state-owned enterprise, and the controlling entity is called its parent (or the parent company).

A parent company does not have to be the larger or “more powerful” entity; it is possible for the parent company to be smaller than a subsidiary, or the parent may be larger than some or all of its subsidiaries (if it has more than one). The parent and the subsidiary do not necessarily have to operate in the same locations, or operate the same businesses, but it is also possible that they could conceivably be competitors in the marketplace. Also, because a parent company and a subsidiary are separate entities, it is entirely possible for one of them to be involved in legal proceedings, bankruptcy, tax delinquency, indictment and/or under investigation, while the other is not.

The most common way that control of a subsidiary is achieved, is through the ownership of shares in the subsidiary by the parent. These shares give the parent the necessary votes to determine the composition of the board of the subsidiary, and so exercise control. This gives rise to the common presumption that 50% plus one share is enough to create a subsidiary. There are, however, other ways that control can come about, and the exact rules both as to what control is needed, and how it is achieved, can be complex. A subsidiary may itself have subsidiaries, and these, in turn, may have subsidiaries of their own. A parent and all its subsidiaries together are called a “group”, although this term can also apply to cooperating companies and their subsidiaries with varying degrees of shared ownership.

Subsidiaries are separate, distinct legal entities for the purposes of taxation and regulation. For this reason, they differ from divisions, which are businesses fully integrated within the main company, and not legally or otherwise distinct from it.

Note

This list is being compiled using definitions provided at various sources. I tried my best to give the best general explanation of all the term. If any term need correction or improvement in its explanation, please use the comment section to do so. I will look through it.

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